Images

Hands-on at this exhibit

  • Get your photo taken in 3D
  • See through a wall with a single-pixel camera
  • Image light traveling in air

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Further reading

Sun, B. et al. 2013 3D Computational Imaging with Single-Pixel Detectors. Science 340, 844-847

Faccio, D. & Leach, J. 2013 Ghost Imaging in Three Dimensions. Science 340, 821-822

Welsh, S. et al. 2014 Fast full-color computational imaging with single-pixel detectors. Optics Express 21, 23068-23074 

 

How do you take images so fast that you can see light travelling through air? How do you take pictures without using a camera? And how do you use the latest technology to look around corners and see objects hidden from view? These are the questions that researchers from Heriot-Watt University and the University of Glasgow - the Creative Cameras team - are investigating. Our research is focused on developing new strategies for imaging which allow us to see the world in a new perspective.

 
How do you take images so fast that you can see light travelling through air? How do you use the latest technology to look around corners and see objects hidden from view? Discover novel strategies for imaging, which allow us to see the world in a new perspective.

We are constantly capturing pictures with our digital cameras and mobile phones, but the images we capture are largely restricted to 2D, to visible wavelengths, and to long exposure times. Our research challenges what is possible with a camera.

Creative Cameras demonstrate technologies that enable us to video light travelling through air, take 3D pictures with a regular camera, and take images in the infrared part of the spectrum with a camera with only a single pixel. 

One of the cameras that we  demonstrate has two very special properties. The first is its sensitivity to single photons – each pixel is around ten times more sensitive than a human eye; the second is its speed – each pixel can be activated for just 67 picoseconds, that’s more than a billion times faster than you or I can blink. The camera allows us to film at the speed of light – we can video pulses of light as they travel through air.  One  application of this technology is looking around corners to see objects hidden from view.

Lead image: A 3D imaging camera which obtains 3D images by illuminating an object from different positions.